Study Resources

South Africa

The Covenant – James A Michener

Conservation issues

Books:

Game Changer – Glen Martin

Killing for Profit – Julian Rademeyer

Operation Lock and the War on Rhino Poaching – John Hanks

Are conservation and protecting animals the same thing? In Game Changer, award-winning environmental reporter Glen Martin takes a fresh look at this question as it applies to Africa’s megafauna. Martin assesses the rising influence of the animal rights movement and finds that the policies championed by animal welfare groups could lead paradoxically to the elimination of the very species—including elephants and lions—that are the most cherished. In his anecdotal and highly engaging style, Martin takes readers to the heart of the conflict. He revisits the debate between conservationists, who believe that people whose lives are directly impacted by the creation of national parks and preserves should be compensated, versus those who believe that restrictive protection that forbids hunting is the most effective way to conserve wildlife and habitats. Focusing on the different approaches taken by Kenya, Tanzania, and Namibia, Martin vividly shows how the world’s last great populations of wildlife have become the hostages in a fight between those who love animals and those who would save them.

Forestry:

a recent (August 2016) article trying to get to the nub of the forestry problem:

The world’s forests are being destroyed at a breathtaking pace.

In September, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) will convene the World Forestry Congress in Durban, a gathering dominated by the timber industry. FAO’s approach to forests has long been marred by a fundamental mistake: They define forests as mere tree cover. Rainforests can be razed and replaced with rubber plantations, or highly biodiverse temperate and subtropical forests can be cut down to make way for sterile pine or eucalyptus plantations – yet by FAO’s definition, this qualifies as ‘no net deforestation’. If grasslands are ripped up or peasants’ land is grabbed and plowed up by companies to establish industrial monoculture tree plantations which many call Green Deserts – FAO calls it ‘afforestation’.

Read the rest of the story on Film For Africa Website:

CONNECTING AFRICA TO THE WORLD

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